The Splendor of Persia, Persepolis

Once upon a time the king of greatest empire in the world decided to build a capital just to show the world his emperor’s wealth, power, and greatness. The king was Darius and the capital was Persepolis. Persia’s political capital where the laws were made was the city of Susa.

Darius began building Persepolis around 518 B.C. as the ceremonial center for the Achaemenid dynasty. But Darius did not make it to see the stunning outcome of the hands that carved out the columns, stairs, arches, and statues from stones of “Mercy Mountain” in Fars province. It took one hundred years for Persepolis to become ready for galas and ceremonies. Darius’s son Xerexes was fortunate to see this glorious city.

Today the ruins of Persepolis have such irreplaceable values that made this structure a legacy to the world and the main destination to those who take a tour to Iran.

The revenge of its enemy brought the dark days for Persepolis and the Achaemenid Empire. Persepolis was burned by the Greek general named Alexander. He took revenge from Persians because they burned the city of Athens in a war. Before Alexander turned Persepolis into ashes he took home all the gold and silver from this city which had to be carried on twenty thousand mules and five thousand camels.

Now the ruins of this city have become the destination for those who want to take a tour to Iran to see the splendor of an empire that once their glories made other emperors to come and dedicate their most valuable gifts form silk to gold and jewelry to the majestic kings of Persia.

A tour to Iran will not be accomplished without seeing the Persepolis. In Persepolis the Persian history becomes alive. As you walk on the site the gigantic columns, arches, and gates will tell you stories about a dynasty and its kings who were the protectors of humanity, regardless of one’s nationality.

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  1. […] of achievement when we proudly stood at 5671m with our token Iranian flag. The sheer size of UNESCO Persepolis and her amazing architecture blew us all away and that was after a couple of the group bravely read […]

  2. […] reliefs and impressive gateways and columns will give you this sense how grand this empire was.  Persepolis originally named Parsa is located 62km from […]

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